Editor’s pickHurlington Racquet Centre, a show of green architecture

11-09-2017
Hurlington,Metsa Wood,Kerto LVL

The Hurlingham racquet centre is 35 metres wide and 55 metres long. The main span consists of suspended steel beams. To give the courts space and reduce the cost, they are spaced with large gaps.

The Hurlingham Club is a green oasis of tradition, renowned throughout the world as one of the largest private clubs. It has a sunken, low-profile shape and a curved green sedum roof to minimise the environmental impact of the building.

The Racquet Centre, designed by David Morley Architects, has four indoor tennis courts and four squash courts. It is 35 metres wide and 55 metres long. To give the courts space and reduce the costs, the beams are spaced with large gaps of 12.9 metres. To fill these gaps, the architect wanted to see wood.

The joint design work between the structural engineers and Metsä Wood resulted in a shallower roof construction with lightweight Kerto® LVL elements, still accommodating the large span and heavy green roof. With any other material, trusses would have had to be more densely spaced.

To accommodate the curve of the structure four different element widths were determined, totalling 140 prefabricated Kerto® LVL elements.


The Kerto LVL elements that make up the vaulted roof construction are 12.9 metres long and have a total height of 645mm and a maximum width of 1,200mm. To accommodate the curve of the structure, four different widths were determined, totalling 140 prefabricated Kerto LVL elements. The roof elements fit flush with the vaulted, spaced, steel bowstring truss.

In order to guarantee an easy installation of the roof, the supports and the installation process were considered at the design stage.

The depth of the Kerto® LVL elements determined the depth of the curved steel member, as the steel had to be flush with the elements to accommodate the green roof structure above.

The depth of the Kerto LVL elements determined the depth of the curved steel member, as the steel had to be flush with the elements to accommodate the green roof structure above. The connection detail between the wood and the steel element therefore were very accurately designed. The project team used BIM technology to ensure the steel and the wood elements fitted together “like a hand in a glove”.

 

Text and images: Metsa Wood


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